East Hoathly Village Concerns Blog

lots of acronyms – please see categories: Abbreviations

Archive for the ‘Objections’ Category

Community Habitat Mapping (Thanks to Nick Daines)

Thursday, May 18th, 2017

As Wealden do not appear to challenge developers when they assert that development will increase biodiversity by providing private gardens, something like this may be useful to better understand the biodiversity we currently have:

https://www.facebook.com/events/640152019517000/

Wealden’s golden goose.

Monday, May 8th, 2017

Countryside is our biggest asset

Latest on the WDC Local Plan (27th April 2017 special thanks to Nick Daines)

Monday, May 1st, 2017
Responding to a question from SVC Group Secretary (www.stopvinescorner.co.uk): ……has the WDC Local Plan ‘progress’ gone a bit ‘quiet’?
Nick Daines replies:
“””
You are right, publically at least, progress on the local plan has gone quiet. No evidence studies/documents are available even though the draft plan makes many references to them.

The draft plan was first available in the agenda papers published on 3 March for the Local Plan Subcommittee and Joint Planning Committee’s 13 March meetings. The proposal was for 14,102 houses to be built between 2013 – 2028. Wealden acknowledged that NOx damage to Ashdown Forest may be an issue and was modelling the effect from 11,456 houses as an alternative. The recommendation before both committees was that the portfolio holder recommends the draft plan to Full Council for consultation and submission.

On 13 March, Wealden told both committees that the 14,101 houses would cause unacceptable damage to the Forest and they would be proceeding with the 11,456 houses. This would mean changing policies in the draft plan and the housing allocations. However, the recommendation was unchanged and both committees duly accepted it!

The agenda papers for the 22 March Full Council meeting recommended that the draft plan be approved for publication for consultation and submission to the Secretary of State.  However, at the meeting Wealden accepted that the evidence base was not complete (notably the Sustainability Appraisal, which is a statutory requirement) and that further work was needed on the draft plan. The recommendation was changed to noting progress on the plan and requesting that the plan be brought back to council at the earliest opportunity. The council accepted this revised recommendation.

Clearly, Wealden is in considerable disarray – on 3 March expecting councillors to prove a plan for 14,101 houses, but by 22 March accepting that some very fundamental areas of the 3 March plan would have to change.

It is now apparent that any further development in Wealden will cause damage to Ashdown Forest and that no further development can proceed until the compensatory measures have been agreed and delivered.

Wealden is confidant that the 5YLS is now not an issue – they accept that they do not have a 5YLS, but due to the Ashdown Forest issue, have evidence (unpublished) that any development will cause damage so is therefore unsustainable. I wonder how long developers will accept this position before one submits an application and then tests the rejection though an appeal?

The next draft of the plan will have to contain a mitigation strategy approved by Natural England for Ashdown Forest. I anticipate that Wealden will be discussing with landowners whether they would be willing to make their land available to provide mitigation. This may take some time as the landowners will want a fee for loss of use which will have to be paid by developers. Thus, the next draft may take some time to surface. Alternatively, if Natural England cave in and decide that the NOx damage can be accepted, then the next draft could follow shortly thereafter…..

“””

Councillors lament lack of localism in planning system (thank you David Connoley)

Tuesday, January 24th, 2017

lament

Councillors have lamented the lack of local democracy in house planning, with a majority warning that the system leans too far in the favour of housing developers at the cost of local communities, a survey has revealed.

A survey of over 1,200 ward councillors in England carried out by the Local Government Information Unit (LGiU), and commissioned by the conservation charity the National Trust, has revealed that councillors believe the current planning system does not consider the wishes of councils and communities as much as it should.

Councillors have warned against the current system with over half of those surveyed advising that planning departments are not adequately resourced and that sites are being improved for new housing despite not being in line with the local plan, including sites on green belt land.

“The planning system is one of the fundamental pillars of local democracy, allowing communities to help shape the physical structure of the places they live,” said Jonathan Carr-West, chief executive of the LGiU.

“Councillors are the most important link between communities and that system. Our survey with the National Trust shows that many councillors feel that this democratic tool is at risk of being undermined.”

The survey revealed ongoing councillor reservations about the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), with only 18% of councillors feeling that design has improved since it was introduced. The NPPF was criticised by the CLG Select Committee as long ago as 2014 for failing to protect against unsustainable development and was earmarked for a comprehensive overview in April last year.

Particularly, councillors have raised concerns about the loosening of the planning system permitted by the NPPF such as the introduction of permitted development rights for home extensions, office to residential use conversions and other changes of use. Approximately 60% of councillors believe that due to the framework, green belt land is at risk of being allocated for housing by their councils within the next five years.

The results of the survey come as the government prepares to announce its housing white paper in response to the growing problems in ensuring a sufficient number of homes nationwide, particularly affordable homes.

Ingrid Samuel, historic environment director at the National Trust, declared it “worrying” that councillors feel that the NPPF hasn’t delivered the localism that was promised despite almost five years having passed since its introduction.

“If ministers are serious about local plans being at the heart of the planning system, then they should invest in council planning teams and use the Housing White Paper to give them the tools to deliver good quality housing in the right places,” Samuel said.

The LGiU and the National Trust expressed hopes that the government will use the paper to improve council confidence in the planning system, instead of setting rigid housing numbers which do not consider local factors such as areas of outstanding national beauty.

Their suggestions for steps the government could take included more resources for local planning authorities, stronger government backing for councils setting design standards, and an increased ability for councils to recognise local constraints and focus development appropriately.

Objections to Hesmond Stud planning application WD20162796MAO

Sunday, January 8th, 2017

Link to Suggested Objections (short list).

Link to Village Concerns Steering Committee Objections

Why we have to challenge the WDC Sustainability Assessment for East Hoathly

Sunday, January 8th, 2017

The perverse logic WDC used to target massive development on East Hoathly.

Objections to the WDC SA for – Hesmonds Stud

Thursday, December 22nd, 2016

You remember that WDC Sustainability Assessment for East Hoathly North(1) – Hesmond Stud, that you were asked to comment on? Well your responses have been sorted and the result can be viewed here. Why did we bother? Well you might consider some of the objections are worth raising when you comment on the planning application. In fact such is the collision between the WDC comments and your views, this report might help us with a possible legal challenge to stop this application.

Changes to New Homes Bonus (special thanks to Nick Daines)

Friday, December 16th, 2016

15122016 Changes to New Homes Bonus

Air pollution in East Sussex

Monday, December 5th, 2016

The UK Government has been ordered by a High Court judge to draw up an improved plan by July next year which must bring air pollution within legal limits.

UK domestic law places a requirement for Local Authorities to try to meet air quality objectives. The European Commission did start legal proceedings against the UK Government in 2014 for failing to meet legal limits which could result in substantial fines. In the same year the UK Government wrote to all Local Authorities to remind them that these fines could be passed down to them through the Localism Act, if it could be proven that they did not do enough to improve the situation.

There’s a budget of up to £75 million to tinker with the A27 (2015-2020). But what about the A22?  Both the A27 and the A22 suffer from congestion, delays and below average journey times with some drivers diverting to unsuitable local roads. Think of the air pollution! Think what further pollution 300 extra cars in East Hoathly will create: we have no local train station; the bus service cannot support commuting to work.

SWOT Assessment of Wealden 5YLS

Monday, September 12th, 2016

SWOT Assessment of Wealden 5YLS